Once a quarter we will be discussing the wonders of the world of auditing with (you guessed it) actual auditors! Our Summer Spotlight fell on Sandra Hilton, Performance Audit Manager with the Oregon Audits Division, and in her free time, newly adopted Cat Assistant.

What should we call you?
Call me Sandy.

How long have you been an auditor?
I’ve been an auditor for 26 years. I now work primarily on the performance side, but over the course of my career about half of that time was spent working on financial audits and hotline related work.

What led you to auditing?
I wanted to get my CPA certificate! Two years of relevant experience was required. That was the original reason I applied for the job as a staff auditor; however, once I got into it I found that I really, really liked it. I’ve been here ever since.

Many people, upon hearing the word ‘auditing,’ may assume that the job is just deadly dull. Is auditing boring?
I am never bored. Auditing is exciting! There are so many different things to look at, and it’s important work that you get to take on with a whole team. Teamwork, among other things, makes what we do interesting. Of course, after a few rounds of reading the same audit report, it does have its dull moments…

Why is your job important?
Because we can make a difference. We push things along- changing the course of a program or agency by incremental degrees and effecting some substantial long term changes. Similar to altering the trajectory of a rocket, tiny degree shifts make huge differences down the line. Audits build upon previous audit work and are often interconnected. We help the agencies and people we work with know which ‘tweaks’ can make a meaningful difference to achieving their goals.

Any personal victory stories, or tales of challenges overcome and differences made?
The TANF Audit we released a few years ago issued a number of recommendations that DHS used to  overhaul an underperforming program. In following, the most recent Governor’s Budget added $30 million to redesign and improve the program. Some of that money went to investments in support services and smoothing the transition for families off the ‘welfare cliff.’

Any auditing horror stories?
Not exactly a horror story, but it was definitely amusing. Years ago I did a site visit where I saw a safe with an ‘Open’ sign hanging on it. Apparently the safe was difficult to open, so the agency in question just left it open and put a double-sided ‘open-closed’ sign on the front. The safe was full of blank checks, and even had a signature stamp machine. Combined with the lack of segregation of duties and easy access to the safe, it was definitely a ‘one-stop’ shopping opportunity!

What do you do when you’re not auditing?
My number one hobby is gardening, and I enjoy feeding birds as well. I also adopted a cat recently- well, he adopted me. I’ve outfitted him with a break-away collar and a bell to warn the birds that a cat is around. I really enjoy being outside and seeing the new plant growth. When I’m inside I play the piano, and I am very interested in tracking genealogy.

Cats or dogs, and why?
I always thought I was a dog person. I love the affection. Cats are more independent. My husband had a cat before we were married, so I guess you could say I married the cat, too. I’ve learned to respect cats, and I respect them on their terms. I grew to understand and love our first cat. This new cat has also wiggled his way into my heart.

Any words of advice for new auditors?
That’s a tough one! But here goes… Be open to learning. Don’t be close-minded to ideas. Cultivate an attitude of willingness to hear different perspectives- it will help you realize the richness of what we do. As people we tend to focus a lot on ‘what we like.’ You may get a lot out of hearing stuff from people that you may not agree with. Be willing to learn from anybody, no matter who they are. Also, cut each other some slack. You’ll never know everything.

Final thoughts?
I’m really proud of our work here. I want to leave the world a better place, and here you have the opportunity to have a positive impact. That drives my work. When you get a whole group of smart people passionate about making a difference together, you can make change happen.