Jewel Lansing

Jewel Lansing

Oregon has many good local auditors who don’t limit the scope of their work to financial matters. They also produce performance audits that trigger improvements in their government’s programs. The genealogy of performance auditing in Oregon traces back to Jewel Lansing, the elected Multnomah County Auditor from 1975 to 1982.

The story I heard from Jewel is that the Multnomah County elected chair, Don Clark, approached her, hoping to get a professional candidate to run for the elected auditor position against the incumbent. Jewel was a CPA, and former teacher, engaged in local issues and civic matters. She agreed to run and defeated her opponent.

Early in that campaign she agreed to pick up a guest speaker at the airport for a CPA training conference. The speaker was Lennis Knighton, a professor at Brigham Young University, who had written a paper defining a type of accountability that is now known as performance auditing. During the drive she decided to adopt it as part of her campaign platform.

This wasn’t the first performance auditing in the nation however. Up in King County, their legislative auditor, Rol Malan, had received support and federal funding to explore performance auditing at the local level. In this case the funding source was the GAO (now the Government Accountability Office, originally the General Accounting Office).

After two terms as Multnomah County Auditor, Jewel ran and was elected Portland City Auditor. There, against considerable resistance from the mayor and several city commissioners, she introduced performance auditing in 1984. I was fortunate to be one of her hires in 1985. Jewel chose not to run again and left office in 1986.

In 1990 Jewel came back through the City offices one day and suggested that I consider running for Multnomah County Auditor. The value of that office had declined because there had been no requirements that a candidate needed to be a professional auditor or accountant. I made the leap and she agreed to be my campaign chair. I was elected and served two terms, then ran for City Auditor and served for two terms and part of a third, following in Jewel’s footsteps.

Jewel had also planted seeds for two other local performance audit functions, in Washington County, and at Metro the regional government. Alan Percell, Jewel’s deputy auditor in Multnomah County, was approached and agreed to start a similar function in Washington County. In 1990 the Metro government was conducting a charter review and several local government auditors at Jewel’s encouragement testified that the regional government needed an independent elected auditor, which was added and approved by the voters.

The impact of Jewel’s efforts and the attention of her audits didn’t stop at the local level. Norma Paulus, a contemporary of Jewel’s and the Oregon Secretary of State from 1977 to 1985, first promoted performance auditing by her division. The next secretary, Barbara Roberts, expanded on the idea and the efforts, as did Phil Keisling, her successor.

After I left City Hall in 2009 Secretary of State Kate Brown asked me to lead her Audits Division. It was an honor and challenge to bring what I had learned in nearly 25 years of auditing to the state level. One of our principal auditors, Shanda Miller, was recently appointed the Lane County Auditor, and I like to think that some of Jewel’s legacy rubbed off during my nearly six years together here with Shanda.

And whenever prospective candidates for local elected offices contacted me, I made sure to send them to Jewel who still remains active, writing histories of Portland and Multnomah County. I know that auditors Suzanne Flynn, LaVonne Griffin-Valade, Steve March, Mary Hull Caballero, and Brian Evans have all met with her to talk about their aspirations.

Oregon’s important government accountability has been strongly influenced by the work and contributions of Jewel Lansing. I ran across an article she wrote in 1977 about her early experience in auditing, which you can see below. The observations are still very current.

All of this important government accountability has become a public expectation in Oregon, and in the Northwest for over 40 years. Much of it resulted from the contributions of Jewel Lansing.

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Gary Blackmer Director, Oregon Audits Division

Gary Blackmer
Director, Oregon Audits Division