Report Highlights


The Secretary of State’s Audits Division found that the Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) program should take immediate action to address gaps in program design and oversight in order to improve the safety and well-being of participants in the Consumer-Employed Provider (CEP) program.

Read full report here.

Background

Oregon is a leader in providing in-home long- term care options for older adults and people with disabilities. The most used in-home care program is the Consumer-Employed Provider program, which positions consumers as employers of their homecare worker.

Purpose

The purpose of this audit was to assess the policies and processes used by APD to ensure the needs of consumers in the CEP program are met.

Key Findings

The effectiveness of the Consumer-Employed Provider program is dependent on the consumer, the case manager, and the homecare worker. If each is capable, competent, and supported in their role, the current model can be successful. Our audit found:

1. Some consumers are not receiving the support necessary to ensure required employer duties are being performed, which adds to case managers’ and homecare workers’ responsibilities.
2. Case managers are not consistently contacting consumers, or monitoring services consumers receive due to excessive workloads.
3. Agency requirements do not ensure that homecare workers are prepared to provide the care and assistance consumers need.
4. Due to current data collection and utilization practices, it is difficult for APD to determine if consumers are safe and receiving the care and services they need.
5. Current deficiencies in the program may put consumers’ health and well-being at risk and keep the program from operating as intended.

To reach our findings, we conducted interviews and case file reviews, collected and analyzed CEP consumer data, and researched federal and state standards.

Recommendations

The report includes recommendations to improve Consumer-Employed Provider program implementation and support. Recommendations include consistently following existing monitoring policies, addressing case managers’ excessive workload and responsibilities, and providing more support to consumers and homecare workers.
The Department generally agreed with our findings and recommendations. Its response can be found at the end of the report.