Evergreen Data ReBlog: Is Feminist Data Visualization Actually a Thing? (Yes, and How!)

How can data visualization be feminist? Data is data — it speaks for itself.

A charming idea, to be sure. But it just ain’t true. Feminist data visualization is (and must be) a thing because data, data analysis, and data visualization are never neutral. The premise that, if handled correctly, data can present neutral evidence, is deeply flawed. Culture is embedded into our data at every stage.

As long as humans have been thinking about data viz, we’ve been projecting our worldview onto it.

Guest poster Heather Krause with Datassist discusses the concepts underlying feminist data visualization, how different cultures interpret data, and what data scientists and researchers can do to account for these differences in world view when collecting, analyzing, and presenting information.

Read more here.

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GAO WatchBlog ReBlog: The Internet of Things — Are we ready for 50 billion things?

Your Fitbit, TV remote, microwave, and other wireless devices that use a network to communicate are part of the “Internet of Things” (IoT). Their use is growing fast—some experts forecast that 25-50 billion devices will be in use by 2025.

But the IoT depends on the availability of a finite resource—the radio frequency spectrum.

Read more here about the GAO’s recommendations to the FCC to expand efforts to make more spectrum available, use it more efficiently, or expand spectrum sharing.

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The Balance ReBlog: Communication skills for workplace success (w/ Weird Al bonus video!)

The ability to communicate effectively with superiors, colleagues, and staff is essential, no matter what industry you work in. Workers in the digital age must know how to effectively convey and receive messages in person as well as via phone, email, and social media. Good communication skills will help get hired, land promotions, and be a success throughout your career.

Alison Doyle with CareerToolBelt.com outlines the communication skills that serve both job applicants and workplace peers. Can you guess what the #1 most important skill is?

 

Communication tips not enough? Let Weird Al guide you toward full enlightenment with the following ballad:

 

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Internal Auditor ReBlog: Let’s talk about feedback

Through frequent conversations with practitioners who are relatively new to the internal audit profession — including both people within and outside my organization — it seems there is a disconnect when it comes to feedback. Manager-level employees tell me they often provide informal feedback to the staff and senior auditors who work with them. Meanwhile, those same managers’ staff and seniors say they don’t receive enough feedback, don’t know if they are “on track,” and don’t know what they are doing well and what they can im​prove. This is where a few simple conversation areas can reap great benefits.

Laura Soileau, a director in Postlethwaite & Netterville’s Consulting Department in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, discusses the importance of ongoing communication and relationship building in the workplace when delivering – and receiving – feedback (both in formal performance evaluations and day-to-day). She provides a list of useful questions for supervisors and staff to ask each other, and to ask themselves. Maintaining healthy working relationships and keeping the lines of communication open, professional, and productive “should be a shared responsibility.” Feedback is crucial to keeping performance on track, but in this case, the ‘who and how’ is almost as important as the ‘why.’

Read more here!

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TEDx ReBlog: 9 common-sense rules for getting the most out of meetings

Been in a meeting recently? Sure you have.

When it comes to making the most out of meetings (i.e., productive, clear, professional, and as brief as possible), it’s not uncommon that we drop the ball from time to time. But that doesn’t mean we can’t strive to run meetings as effectively as possible.

Ray Dalio with Bridgewater Associates has some sounds suggestions for making the most of that time you and your coworkers spend locked away in a conference room trying to change the world (or at least, make a decision on the best font for your quarterly report). Clear objectives, firm leadership, and focus top the list, but do yourself a favor and read more here.

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Internal Auditor ReBlog: The value of mentorship

Mentorship is one of the most powerful tools for aspiring internal audit professionals and also provides valuable experiences to mentors. Early in my career, several professionals informally provided me with advice, suggestions, and guidance that helped bring me to where I am today. At the time, I did not realize these individuals were acting as “mentors” but the knowledge, experience, and insights they provided shaped the decisions I made…

At a recent internal audit forum, IIA Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer Bill Michalisin co-facilitated a panel on mentoring and career management… As a fellow Emerging Leader, I reached out to Michalisin and some of the panelists and asked them to share their perspectives on mentorship with Internal Auditor’s readers.

Internal auditor Bill Stahl explores the benefits of formal and informal mentoring in the audit community, and makes suggestions on what to look for in a mentor, where they can be found, and makes the case for mentoring others.

Read more here.

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Internal Auditor ReBlog: Courage is easy when there’s nothing on the line

In her book, Extraordinary Circumstances: The Journey of a Corporate Whistleblower, Cooper counsels internal auditors to “find your courage.” Courage means many things to many people, so thinking about it and discussing it with others you trust can help you reinforce your moral foundation.

In Trusted Advisors: Key Attributes of Outstanding Internal Auditors, one of the nine key attributes I examine is ethical resilience, and in speeches about the book, I talk about internal auditors needing to be ethical AND courageous. I have known many ethical internal auditors who kept their heads down rather than confront highly contentious risks, issues, or results. But being courageous often requires being the lone voice. It doesn’t take quite as much courage to stand in line to point a finger. Indeed, courage does not wait for a choir.

But courage doesn’t suddenly blossom within an internal auditor simply because there is an expectation or strong case for it. I go back to Cooper’s admonition to “find your courage,” which requires practitioners to examine what courage is and under what circumstances their own internal fortitude may be tested.

Read more here.

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