Internal Auditor Repost: Emotional Intelligence for Internal Auditors

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Mike Jacka discusses the usefulness of emotional intelligence for internal auditors.

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Oregon Office of Economic Analysis ReBlog: Oregon’s Unprecedented Growth?

A common refrain our office hears is that Oregon’s growth in recent years is unprecedented. Meaning that we’ve never seen population growth like this before. This is usually in the context of the housing market and explaining away our shortage more as a function of extremely high demand, and less about the supply issues. As such, I think it may be helpful to take a graphical trip down memory lane. The bottom line is that yes, in many places in Oregon, mostly urban, we’re seeing population gains that are better than in the 2000s but on par with the 1970s and the 1990s. Remember, people have been packing up and moving to this part of the world since before Lewis & Clark. Population growth and migration is nothing new. It is ingrained in our community and economy and remains our number one comparative advantage.

Josh Lehner explores Oregon’s history of population growth and shares some hard facts and a nuanced perspective on this hot button topic. Read more here.

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GAO Watchblog ReBlog: Office Space

The federal government spends billions of dollars every year to operate and maintain the roughly 273,000 buildings it owns or leases. But we’ve reported for years on problems with how the federal government manages its real estate—in fact, federal real property management has been on our High-Risk list since 2003.

So, has anything changed? How effectively is the government using its real estate assets? Today’s WatchBlog explores our recent work on reducing office space in federal buildings and telework as a space planning tool.

Read more here.

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Data-Smart City Solutions RePost — Map Monday: Beyond Floods

People tend not to think that bad things will happen to them. This psychological proclivity towards optimism—logically termed “optimism bias”—is in many ways a beneficial feature of the human psyche, as most live better lives when they’re not constantly obsessing over the possibility of some calamity befalling them.

However, the optimism bias also has its disadvantages, as it may discourage people from preparing for emergencies. This was the case during Hurricane Sandy, during which 77 percent of New Yorkers reported that inland flooding was much higher than they expected. In New York City alone, the storm damaged 90,000 buildings, created $19 billion in damage,and killed nearly 50 people.

Chris Bousquet, a Research Assistant and Writer with Harvard’s Ash Center, explores how data sharing can influence human action through the Beyond Floods CARTO platform.

Read more here.

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Evergreen Data ReBlog: Is Feminist Data Visualization Actually a Thing? (Yes, and How!)

How can data visualization be feminist? Data is data — it speaks for itself.

A charming idea, to be sure. But it just ain’t true. Feminist data visualization is (and must be) a thing because data, data analysis, and data visualization are never neutral. The premise that, if handled correctly, data can present neutral evidence, is deeply flawed. Culture is embedded into our data at every stage.

As long as humans have been thinking about data viz, we’ve been projecting our worldview onto it.

Guest poster Heather Krause with Datassist discusses the concepts underlying feminist data visualization, how different cultures interpret data, and what data scientists and researchers can do to account for these differences in world view when collecting, analyzing, and presenting information.

Read more here.

Accountability and Media Data Wonk

GAO WatchBlog ReBlog: The Internet of Things — Are we ready for 50 billion things?

Your Fitbit, TV remote, microwave, and other wireless devices that use a network to communicate are part of the “Internet of Things” (IoT). Their use is growing fast—some experts forecast that 25-50 billion devices will be in use by 2025.

But the IoT depends on the availability of a finite resource—the radio frequency spectrum.

Read more here about the GAO’s recommendations to the FCC to expand efforts to make more spectrum available, use it more efficiently, or expand spectrum sharing.

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The Balance ReBlog: Communication skills for workplace success (w/ Weird Al bonus video!)

The ability to communicate effectively with superiors, colleagues, and staff is essential, no matter what industry you work in. Workers in the digital age must know how to effectively convey and receive messages in person as well as via phone, email, and social media. Good communication skills will help get hired, land promotions, and be a success throughout your career.

Alison Doyle with CareerToolBelt.com outlines the communication skills that serve both job applicants and workplace peers. Can you guess what the #1 most important skill is?

 

Communication tips not enough? Let Weird Al guide you toward full enlightenment with the following ballad:

 

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