The Balance ReBlog: Communication skills for workplace success (w/ Weird Al bonus video!)

The ability to communicate effectively with superiors, colleagues, and staff is essential, no matter what industry you work in. Workers in the digital age must know how to effectively convey and receive messages in person as well as via phone, email, and social media. Good communication skills will help get hired, land promotions, and be a success throughout your career.

Alison Doyle with CareerToolBelt.com outlines the communication skills that serve both job applicants and workplace peers. Can you guess what the #1 most important skill is?

 

Communication tips not enough? Let Weird Al guide you toward full enlightenment with the following ballad:

 

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Internal Auditor ReBlog: Let’s talk about feedback

Through frequent conversations with practitioners who are relatively new to the internal audit profession — including both people within and outside my organization — it seems there is a disconnect when it comes to feedback. Manager-level employees tell me they often provide informal feedback to the staff and senior auditors who work with them. Meanwhile, those same managers’ staff and seniors say they don’t receive enough feedback, don’t know if they are “on track,” and don’t know what they are doing well and what they can im​prove. This is where a few simple conversation areas can reap great benefits.

Laura Soileau, a director in Postlethwaite & Netterville’s Consulting Department in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, discusses the importance of ongoing communication and relationship building in the workplace when delivering – and receiving – feedback (both in formal performance evaluations and day-to-day). She provides a list of useful questions for supervisors and staff to ask each other, and to ask themselves. Maintaining healthy working relationships and keeping the lines of communication open, professional, and productive “should be a shared responsibility.” Feedback is crucial to keeping performance on track, but in this case, the ‘who and how’ is almost as important as the ‘why.’

Read more here!

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TEDx ReBlog: 9 common-sense rules for getting the most out of meetings

Been in a meeting recently? Sure you have.

When it comes to making the most out of meetings (i.e., productive, clear, professional, and as brief as possible), it’s not uncommon that we drop the ball from time to time. But that doesn’t mean we can’t strive to run meetings as effectively as possible.

Ray Dalio with Bridgewater Associates has some sounds suggestions for making the most of that time you and your coworkers spend locked away in a conference room trying to change the world (or at least, make a decision on the best font for your quarterly report). Clear objectives, firm leadership, and focus top the list, but do yourself a favor and read more here.

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Internal Auditor ReBlog: The value of mentorship

Mentorship is one of the most powerful tools for aspiring internal audit professionals and also provides valuable experiences to mentors. Early in my career, several professionals informally provided me with advice, suggestions, and guidance that helped bring me to where I am today. At the time, I did not realize these individuals were acting as “mentors” but the knowledge, experience, and insights they provided shaped the decisions I made…

At a recent internal audit forum, IIA Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer Bill Michalisin co-facilitated a panel on mentoring and career management… As a fellow Emerging Leader, I reached out to Michalisin and some of the panelists and asked them to share their perspectives on mentorship with Internal Auditor’s readers.

Internal auditor Bill Stahl explores the benefits of formal and informal mentoring in the audit community, and makes suggestions on what to look for in a mentor, where they can be found, and makes the case for mentoring others.

Read more here.

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Internal Auditor ReBlog: Courage is easy when there’s nothing on the line

In her book, Extraordinary Circumstances: The Journey of a Corporate Whistleblower, Cooper counsels internal auditors to “find your courage.” Courage means many things to many people, so thinking about it and discussing it with others you trust can help you reinforce your moral foundation.

In Trusted Advisors: Key Attributes of Outstanding Internal Auditors, one of the nine key attributes I examine is ethical resilience, and in speeches about the book, I talk about internal auditors needing to be ethical AND courageous. I have known many ethical internal auditors who kept their heads down rather than confront highly contentious risks, issues, or results. But being courageous often requires being the lone voice. It doesn’t take quite as much courage to stand in line to point a finger. Indeed, courage does not wait for a choir.

But courage doesn’t suddenly blossom within an internal auditor simply because there is an expectation or strong case for it. I go back to Cooper’s admonition to “find your courage,” which requires practitioners to examine what courage is and under what circumstances their own internal fortitude may be tested.

Read more here.

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Governing RePost: Drowning in Data, Cities Turn to ‘Citizen Scientists’

Government has a data problem. Put simply, it collects so much of it that it struggles to analyze most of it.

Of course, states and localities already use data analytics for a lot of things. Departments of revenue, for instance, rely on it to curb tax fraud. Public schools use it to measure student performance and figure out how to boost grades and graduation rates. Cities turn to it to manage traffic congestion and monitor air pollution. But despite all of this, governments are still collecting vast amounts of data and, well, doing nothing with it…

Ted Newcombe discusses a growing trend in local government data analysis, and some of the advantages – and drawbacks – of calling upon nonexperts to help analyze government data. Read more here.

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Internal Auditor ReBlog- Ratings in Audit Reports: Lights or Lightning Rods?

…an audit committee chairman observed that ratings can “shine a light” and help the audit committee quickly focus on the most important findings in a report. However, while ratings may be a “light” for some, they are ultimately a “lightning rod” for others.

Ratings can be a powerful tool, but if management and the audit committee place undue emphasis on them, they tend to have a polarizing effect on line and operating managers whose performance ends up being summarized in a single word: “unsatisfactory.”

Even the most useful tools have their limitations. In this post, IIA CEO Richard Chambers ponders the benefits and drawbacks of the use of ratings systems in internal audits. Read more here.

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