TEDx Reblog: How do you get from diversity to inclusion? Ask these 4 questions about your meetings

Many organizations and companies today track diversity in sex, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and religion, among other factors. For some of their leaders, numerical diversity is seen as the most important — and at times, the only — thing needed to create a varied and vibrant community. But by focusing on headcount, they are making the mistake of believing that diversity and inclusion are the same.

Dolly Chugh, a social psychologist at the NYU Stern School of Business, lays down some words of advice on how to tailor your meetings to create pathways to genuine inclusion. She recommends asking the following four questions, and explains why they should be asked:

Question #1: Who speaks at meetings?

Question #2: Who sits next to whom?

Question #3: Who is listened to?

Question #4: Who gets the credit?

While pathway moments may seem relatively small — those moments when we feel like we’re more or less part of the meeting, when we’re more or less listened to, when we’re more or less credited for our work — they are the ones that help determine whether we’re given greater chances for success and effectiveness, or held back. We can all cultivate the capacity to notice failures of inclusion if and when they happen, and then try to do better going forward.

Read more here, or watch the TED talk below.

 

 

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Harvard Business Review Repost: Why diverse teams are smarter

Striving to increase workplace diversity is not an empty slogan — it is a good business decision. A 2015 McKinsey report on 366 public companies found that those in the top quartile for ethnic and racial diversity in management were 35% more likely to have financial returns above their industry mean, and those in the top quartile for gender diversity were 15% more likely to have returns above the industry mean….

In recent years a body of research has revealed another, more nuanced benefit of workplace diversity: nonhomogenous teams are simply smarter. Working with people who are different from you may challenge your brain to overcome its stale ways of thinking and sharpen its performance.

David Rock and Heidi Grant at the Neuroleadership Institute make the argument in this article that diverse teams can not only improve outcomes, but are actually better at making complex group decisions.

Read more here.

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Office of Economic Analysis ReBlog: Oregon, Diversity and the Middle East

All told, my classification of Arab or Middle Eastern ancestry shows that 2.8 million U.S. residents, or just over 1 percent identifies as such. Here in Oregon the figures are 27,000 and 0.8 percent. To help put those figures in perspective here in Oregon, that’s roughly equivalent to a city the size of Redmond or Tualatin, or slightly larger than Union or Wasco counties.

Oregon isn’t known for being a particularly diverse state. According to the Office of Economic Analysis, despite an uptick in domestic migration, when it comes to inbound migration from other parts of the world, Oregon still lags behind many other states. However, Oregon’s overall diversity is increasing at a faster rate than some other states (due perhaps in part to our relatively small and relatively homogenous population- we have more room for growth and change, and that growth and change may be more apparent).

The Office of Economic Analysis looks into the numbers behind some of these demographic trends in this post.

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