TEDx Reblog: How do you get from diversity to inclusion? Ask these 4 questions about your meetings

Many organizations and companies today track diversity in sex, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and religion, among other factors. For some of their leaders, numerical diversity is seen as the most important — and at times, the only — thing needed to create a varied and vibrant community. But by focusing on headcount, they are making the mistake of believing that diversity and inclusion are the same.

Dolly Chugh, a social psychologist at the NYU Stern School of Business, lays down some words of advice on how to tailor your meetings to create pathways to genuine inclusion. She recommends asking the following four questions, and explains why they should be asked:

Question #1: Who speaks at meetings?

Question #2: Who sits next to whom?

Question #3: Who is listened to?

Question #4: Who gets the credit?

While pathway moments may seem relatively small — those moments when we feel like we’re more or less part of the meeting, when we’re more or less listened to, when we’re more or less credited for our work — they are the ones that help determine whether we’re given greater chances for success and effectiveness, or held back. We can all cultivate the capacity to notice failures of inclusion if and when they happen, and then try to do better going forward.

Read more here, or watch the TED talk below.

 

 

Featured Accountability and Media

TEDx ReBlog: 9 common-sense rules for getting the most out of meetings

Been in a meeting recently? Sure you have.

When it comes to making the most out of meetings (i.e., productive, clear, professional, and as brief as possible), it’s not uncommon that we drop the ball from time to time. But that doesn’t mean we can’t strive to run meetings as effectively as possible.

Ray Dalio with Bridgewater Associates has some sounds suggestions for making the most of that time you and your coworkers spend locked away in a conference room trying to change the world (or at least, make a decision on the best font for your quarterly report). Clear objectives, firm leadership, and focus top the list, but do yourself a favor and read more here.

Accountability and Media Featured