Governing RePost: Fewer people are getting degrees in public service

The latest data from the U.S. Department of Education shows that several of the top government-related academic fields — including criminal justice, political science and public administration — have seen the number of degrees awarded level off or dip slightly over the past few years. This signals a departure from the previous several decades, including the immediate post-recession period, when schools handed out more diplomas in most fields as workers sought to enhance their résumé  during the economic slump.

While awarded degrees have slowed down somewhat in general in the last few years, public service degrees have shown slightly more of a slowdown. What affect this may have on public service employment is hard to say, but you can keep on top of trends and read more here.

 

Accountability and Media Featured

Audit Release: Department of Administrative Services Should Enhance Succession Planning to Address Workforce Risks and Challenges

Report Highlights


The Secretary of State’s Audits Division found that the Department of Administrative Services (DAS) should play a stronger leadership role in addressing key workforce risks and challenges within the state executive branch, through enhanced workforce succession planning.

Read full report here

Background

This audit reviewed succession planning within the Oregon executive branch. Succession planning is an ongoing management process used to ensure workforce continuity and effectiveness, particularly in key leadership and technical functions.

Purpose

The purpose of the audit was to determine if and how the State of Oregon could better plan for future key workforce needs, including preparing state employees to fill key roles.

Key Findings

Within the context that effective succession planning is difficult, complex and is frequently not a priority within the public sector, we found:

  1. DAS has not developed or implemented a state-level succession planning framework, despite recognizing the importance of succession planning.
  2. The lack of a succession planning framework increases workforce risks, such as not developing or retaining knowledgeable and skilled employees to perform critical functions.
  3. These risks are exacerbated by demographic and economic trends, including increasing retirement rates, and a lack of formal succession planning processes within state agencies.
  4. State agencies also report challenges, including inaccessible workforce information, that may hinder strategic human capital management practices and should be addressed at a state level.

To reach our findings we conducted interviews, reviewed documents and reported practices, researched leading practices and analyzed workforce data.

Recommendations

Drawing from national leading practices and benchmarking with other states, the report includes eight recommendations to the Department of Administrative Services focused on implementing a succession planning framework in the Oregon executive branch. Recommendations include providing guidance to agencies, monitoring workforce risks, and working with agencies to identify and address barriers at a state level.

Featured New Audit Release Performance Audit

Office of Economic Analysis ReBlog: Oregon government size, an update

Yes, the public sector here in Oregon continues to grow. We have never had more public employees or more tax revenue than we do today. However the regional economy and the number of total Oregonians has never been larger either. Once you make the adjustment of comparing the public sector to the size of the population, or tax revenues as a share of personal income, Oregon’s public sector hasn’t increased in size for decades. And make no mistake, adjustments like these are the correct way to examine the size of government over time. Reasonable people, and unreasonable ones too I suppose, can debate the proper role and scope of the public sector. However a larger population means there are more residents in need of services, from schools to roads to law enforcement and so forth. And a stronger economy generating jobs and income does translate into more tax dollars for the public sector.

Josh Lehner explores the size and presence of public sector employment in Oregon over the past several decades, and points out some trends that illuminate issues with public education employment and tax revenue. Read more here.

Accountability and Media Featured