TEDx Reblog: How do you get from diversity to inclusion? Ask these 4 questions about your meetings

Many organizations and companies today track diversity in sex, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and religion, among other factors. For some of their leaders, numerical diversity is seen as the most important — and at times, the only — thing needed to create a varied and vibrant community. But by focusing on headcount, they are making the mistake of believing that diversity and inclusion are the same.

Dolly Chugh, a social psychologist at the NYU Stern School of Business, lays down some words of advice on how to tailor your meetings to create pathways to genuine inclusion. She recommends asking the following four questions, and explains why they should be asked:

Question #1: Who speaks at meetings?

Question #2: Who sits next to whom?

Question #3: Who is listened to?

Question #4: Who gets the credit?

While pathway moments may seem relatively small — those moments when we feel like we’re more or less part of the meeting, when we’re more or less listened to, when we’re more or less credited for our work — they are the ones that help determine whether we’re given greater chances for success and effectiveness, or held back. We can all cultivate the capacity to notice failures of inclusion if and when they happen, and then try to do better going forward.

Read more here, or watch the TED talk below.

 

 

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TED talks RePost: Why the secret to success is setting the right goals

In 2008, a Googler, Sundar Pichai, took on an objective which was to build the next generation client platform for the future of web applications — in other words, build the best browser. He was very thoughtful about how he chose his key results. How do you measure the best browser? It could be ad clicks or engagement. No. He said: numbers of users, because users are going to decide if Chrome is a great browser or not. So he had this one three-year-long objective: build the best browser. And then every year he stuck to the same key results, numbers of users, but he upped the ante. In the first year, his goal was 20 million users and he missed it. He got less than 10. Second year, he raised the bar to 50 million. He got to 37 million users. Somewhat better. In the third year, he upped the ante once more to a hundred million. He launched an aggressive marketing campaign, broader distribution, improved the technology, and kaboom! He got 111 million users.

Here’s why I like this story, not so much for the happy ending, but it shows someone carefully choosing the right objective and then sticking to it year after year after year. It’s a perfect story for a nerd like me.

Watch John Doerr break down the whats, the whys, and the hows of effective goal setting, and how it can be applied to both individual and organizational goals.

Like this TED talk? Watch more here!

 

 

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TED ReBlog: A simple exercise to get any team unstuck

It’s the job of a leader to get a team to see, feel and understand their common mission, vision or task. But what I’ve noticed throughout my career is, people on a team tend to focus on the familiar and on their previous experience with how they operate. They bring these memories into how they frame solutions to any new task. As a leader who wants to inspire creativity in your team, you must keep reminding them to focus on their new task — and that accomplishing it might involve their trying different approaches and strategies.

It’s easy to get stuck in a particular mode of thinking. That line of thinking may serve us well most of the time- until it doesn’t anymore. Jim Crupi outlines in this post one of his exercises aimed at getting teams to think more creatively about problem solving.

via A simple exercise to help get any team unstuck — ideas.ted.com

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TEDx ReBlog: What great leadership and music have in common

 

Music is all-consuming. Our reaction to a great song can be so visceral that we are forever connected to it. Hearing that song can bring you back to a moment in time, and often, it binds you to a person too; every time you hear it, you are there with them again, reliving a wonderful moment. This is something every leader aspires to do with those around them as well: to inspire and move people like great music does.

In 1996, I watched a concert with singers from around the world, including Zucchero and Pavarotti. I was amazed by the performers — but beyond that, I was enthralled by the leadership lessons embedded in the music…

Jim Crupi, a management consultant, shares some interesting parallels between music and leadership in this TEDx post. Read more here.

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TEDx Repost: Not sure what to think about something? Good.

“Certainty is preposterous,” says Milton Glaser (TED Talk: Using Design to Make Things New (see below)). “Fundamentally, one cannot be certain about anything.” Glaser, who doesn’t shy away from speaking plainly, prefers a mindset that embraces ambiguity. For the 86-year-old, this is “a basic tool for perceiving reality” — and a driving force throughout his storied career.

Auditors frequently deal with uncertainties and ambiguous, hard to define problems- upon which we are asked to make fairly certain and unambiguous recommendations. We view this one of our professional challenges, a barrier to increased efficiency and the full realization of agency and program missions. But can it also be seen as an opportunity for developing a much deeper understanding of complex topics, or even as an avenue for necessary change?

In the TED talk below, celebrated graphic designer Milton Glaser discusses using the ambiguities surrounding a historical subject to create a series of paintings that take a unique perspective on that subject. Read Tom Roston’s article about the TED talk here, or watch for yourself below:

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TEDx Reblog: Career advice for millennials (and really, anyone)

It’s a few months after graduation, which means the luckiest new college grads are knee-deep into internships and entry-level jobs. How to stand out? Business writer Margaret Heffernan suggests: Start by taking a coffee break with your coworkers.

Management thinker Margaret Heffernan has a few pointers for building a career and building stronger, smarter organizations. At the crux? Build relationships, work together, take care of yourself, and never stop learning.

Read more about her perspective on building better employees and organizations here, and be sure to take a few minutes to enjoy her TED talk touching on the benefits of social cohesion in the workplace.

 

Photo courtesy of © Dana Rothstein | Dreamstime Stock Photos

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