ALGA Repost: Trust, these days

Auditors know how difficult it can be to muster facts to develop findings, workpaper by workpaper, and draft after draft, to get the language right. In contrast, someone can easily broadcast misinformation or, worse, distrust and skepticism about others’ information. Mark Twain had a good quote: “A lie can travel halfway around the world before the truth can get its shoes on.”

What should auditors do in these times of fewer reporters holding local government accountable, and less public confidence in facts?

Our very own auditing sage Gary Blackmer discusses the nature and necessity of trust as it pertains to government auditing. Read more here.

Accountability and Media Featured

Trust and Trustworthiness

As auditors, we strive to ensure that government functions fairly, efficiently, and effectively.  Auditing has long been one of the methods used to ensure that government is performing to expectations, and is part of a broader system of accountability that minimizes incidences of corruption and the misuse of public funds.

Despite these measures, it is frequently reported that trust in government has dropped to historic lows. State and local governments have retained higher levels of public trust than the federal government, but they have also seen declines in reported public trust since hitting a peak in 2001.

But is reported public trust a true indicator that something has gone wrong, or right? Is it something that we as auditors need to keep in mind as we go about our work?

In the following video, Onora O’Neill discusses trust, and it’s often ignored cousin, trustworthiness.

Accountability and Media Featured